Shop at Amazon US

Contributions

If you like the website and want to contribute to the running costs then please do so below. All contributions are most welcome.

PayPal - The safer, easier way to pay online.

Just after sunset as soon as its dark enough, planets Mars and Saturn can be seen towards the south from northern locations or towards the northeast from southern locations. Mars is now moving rapidly eastwards, started the month in Libra before crossing into Scorpius on August 2nd where it remains until the 21st. Saturn on the other hand reaches its secondary stationary point on August 13th, consequently appearing to the naked-eye effectively like a "fixed" star this month. Also located nearby is first magnitude red supergiant star Antares (α Sco) and of the three objects, Mars (mag. -0.6) is the brightest followed by Saturn (mag. +0.4) and then Antares (mag. +1.0).

On August 11th and August 12th, some pleasant early evening viewing opportunities occur when the Moon moves in the same region of sky. This also coincides with peak activity of the annual Perseids meteor shower, so some bright shooting stars may also be visible. However, of course the best time to view the meteors is during the early hours of the morning after the Moon has set. The images below show the view just before midnight on August 11th and 12th from London, England. From other mid-latitude northern locations the scene appears similar to that shown.

The Moon, Mars, Saturn and Antares as seen after sunset on August 11, 2016 from London, England (credit:- stellarium/freestarcharts)

The Moon, Mars, Saturn and Antares as seen after sunset on August 12, 2016 from London, England (credit:- stellarium/freestarcharts)

Mars and Saturn during August 2016 (credit:- freestarcharts)

Mars and Saturn during August 2016 - pdf format (credit:- freestarcharts)

See also

The Planets this Month - August 2016