Uranus reaches opposition on October 3, 2013

Uranus, the distant ice giant reaches opposition on October 3, 2013. The seventh planet from the Sun is currently located in the constellation of Pisces just southeast of the large "Square of Pegasus". At magnitude +5.7, Uranus is towards the naked eye visibility limit. One great challenge is to try and spot the planet without optical aid. To do this you will need dark moonless skies, away from light pollution and good seeing conditions. If you then manage to spot the planet, you will join a select group of people who have managed to achieve this.

If you can't manage to locate Uranus with the naked eye, don't worry; it's a very easy binocular or small telescope target.

Uranus as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2005 (NASA/ESA/M. Showalter/SETI Institute)

The ideal starting point to locate Uranus is the "Square of Pegasus". Located about 10 degrees south of the base of the square of Pegasus is a circlet of six mainly 4th magnitude stars that form the southern fish of Pisces. Next move about 20 degrees east of this asterism to the star delta (δ) Psc (mag. +4.4). Located about 5 degrees southwest of δ Psc is Uranus. In the same binocular or telescope wide field view as Uranus is 92 G. Psc (HIP 2954), a magnitude +6.4 star that's slightly fainter than the planet. It's positioned 0.5 degrees southwest of Uranus.

Uranus Finder Chart for October 2013

Uranus Finder Chart for October 2013 - pdf format

At opposition, Uranus is located approx. 19.040 AU or 2848.3 million km (1769.9 million miles) from Earth. On this day the planet is visible all night; it rises in the east when the Sun sets and sets in the west as the Sun rises. With an apparent diameter of only 3.7 arc seconds, small telescopes at high magnification show a small blue-green disk, but even when viewed through large amateur telescopes it's difficult to notice any surface details.

The co-ordinates of Uranus at opposition are:- R.A. = 0hr 39m 12.4s, Dec = +3d 25m 46.3s (J2000)

Sky Highlights - July 2016

Mercury, Venus and Jupiter
Mercury, Venus and Jupiter visible together in the evening sky from southern and tropical latitudes from July until September 2016

Moon and Jupiter
Jupiter and the waxing crescent Moon form a nice grouping on July 9, 2016 with an occultation visible from the southern tip of Africa

Moon, Mars, Saturn and Antares
The Moon, Mars and Saturn close together during evenings from July 14 to 16, 2016

Meteor Shower
Delta Aquariids (Aquarids) meteor showers peak on July 29, 2016

R Aquilae within binocular range
Mira type variable star R Aquilae (R Aql) now within binocular range

The Planets
This Month's Guide

Algol Minima
Algol eclipse dates and times for July 2016

Comet
PanSTARRS (C/2013 X1) a binocular and small telescope comet.

Northern Hemisphere
Evening
West:- Jupiter (mag. -1.8)
South:- Mars (mag. -1.4 to -0.8), Saturn (mag. +0.2)
Midnight
Southwest:- Mars, Saturn
Southeast:- Neptune (mag. +7.8)
East:- Uranus (mag. +5.8)
Morning
South:- Neptune
Southeast:- Uranus

Southern Hemisphere
Evening
West:- Venus (mag. -3.9), Mercury (mag. -1.2 to -0.2) both second half of the month
West:- Jupiter
Northeast:- Mars, Saturn
Midnight
West:- Mars, Saturn
Northeast:- Neptune
East:- Uranus
Morning
Northwest:- Neptune
North:- Uranus

Deep Sky
Naked Eye:-
Melotte 111 - Mel 111 - The Coma Star Cluster (Open Cluster)
Messier 44 - M44 - The Praesepe (Open Cluster)
NGC 869 and NGC 884 - The Double Cluster - Open Clusters
Binoculars / Small telescopes:-
Messier 13 – M13 - Great Hercules Globular Cluster
Messier 3 - M3 - Globular Cluster
Messier 81 - M81 - Bode's Galaxy (Spiral Galaxy)
Messier 82 - M82 - Cigar Galaxy (Starburst Galaxy)
Messier 27 - M27 - The Dumbbell Nebula (Planetary Nebula)

Shop at Amazon US

Shop at Amazon US

Current Moon Phase

CURRENT MOON

Contributions

If you like the website and want to contribute to the running costs then please do so below. All contributions are most welcome.